How To Report A Cycling Accident To The Police And Claim Compensation

If you’ve been involved in a road traffic collision, you may want to know whether reporting a cycling accident to the police is mandatory. In this guide, we are going to look at in which circumstances you must report a cycling collision to the police. There are various steps you could take following a road traffic accident, which are set out in the Highway Code, some of which are legal requirements. 

Additionally, if you meet the eligibility criteria to file a bike injury claim, a police report could be useful evidence. This guide takes a look at the eligibility you need to satisfy in order to have a valid cycle claim, as well as a few more examples of supporting evidence. You may also be interested in how cycling accident compensation could be awarded for a successful claim. This guide will look at how cycling injury claims could be settled. 

If you wish to pursue a cycle accident injury claim, you may like to have the support of a personal injury solicitor during the claims process. This guide concludes with a look at how a specialist bike injury solicitor can help you on a No Win No Fee basis. 

Free advice about cycling accidents compensation claims is available from our advisory team 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. To talk about your cycling injury claim:

  • Call 020 8050 2736
  • Send a request for a call back by filling in our claim online form. 
  • Enquire about making a cycling accident claim in our live chat. 

A cyclist and driver exchange details after an accident.

Select A Section 

  1. Information About Reporting A Cycling Accident To The Police
  2. What Could You Do After Reporting A Cycling Accident To The Police?
  3. Are You Able To Claim For A Cycling Accident?
  4. How Much Cycling Accident Compensation Could You Receive?
  5. What Are The Benefits Of Making A No Win No Fee Cycling Accident Claim?
  6. More Resources Related To Cycling Accident Claims

Information About Reporting A Cycling Accident To The Police

Rules and regulations for anyone who uses the roads can be found in the Highway Code. This includes information about reporting a cycling accident to the police. For some collisions involving a vehicle and a bike, the police (and other emergency services) may arrive at the scene without you phoning them. Rules 286 and 287 cover reporting collisions to the police. 

Under these rules, if a collision with a motor vehicle caused damage or injury, the driver must exchange details with anyone who has a relevant reason to request them, such as injured third parties. If those expected to provide details do not when necessary, they must report to the police within 24 hours.

If you meet the eligibility requirements to claim cycling accident compensation, you can submit the police report as part of the personal injury claims process

Police offer looks at her phone to record a police incident number.

What Could You Do After Reporting A Cycling Accident To The Police?

Following a crash with a vehicle, you may want to collect the driver’s name, address and mobile phone number, vehicle registration number and insurance details. If they leave the scene or refuse to give you their details, you may want to consider reporting the cycling accident to the police.

Additional Steps To Take After Cycling Accidents:

It is vital that you seek medical attention if you suffer injuries in a road traffic accident. Injuries that may only seem minor could turn out to be something more serious.

Here we have provided a list of evidence that you could collect if you intend on making a personal injury claim after your cycling road collision:

  • If you are making a personal injury claim for your cycling injuries, your medical records can prove what injuries you suffered.
  • Collect witness contact information. Witnesses can give a statement later into the bike accident claims process should you wish to file one. 
  • Note the details of the parties involved and the vehicles involved in the incident.
  • Photographs from the scene, or footage from a helmet camera. 
  • Seek legal advice. You may want legal advice to get your case started (if you meet the requirements to claim). One of the advisors from our team could help answer your questions about the claims process and what evidence you could submit. Additionally, if you meet the eligibility, they could connect you to one of the No Win No Fee solicitors from our panel. 

Are You Able To Claim For A Cycling Accident?

You could be eligible to claim personal injury compensation for injuries sustained in your cycling road traffic accident. While navigating the roads, each road user (including motor vehicle drivers, motorbike riders, cyclists and pedestrians) owes each other a duty of care to use the roads in a way that avoids causing injury and damage. In addition to following the rules and regulations found in the Highway Code, road users must adhere to the Road Traffic Act 1988 as part of complying with the duty of care that they owe each other. 

If you would like to file a personal injury claim, you will need to prove that a driver owed you a duty of care, that they breached their duty of care, and that this resulted in you sustaining injuries.

For example, if a driver was speeding or driving in a dangerous manner, or didn’t stop at the traffic lights, this is a breach of duty. If this breach meant they knocked you off your bike and you sustained injuries in this incident, you could be eligible to claim compensation. 

To further discuss the cycling accident claims eligibility critiera, call an advisor. 

A personal injury law book about claiming for cycling accidents.

How Much Cycling Accident Compensation Could You Receive?

Settlements could consist of up to two heads of claim: general and special damages. 

To compensate for the physical pain and mental suffering sustained in the bicycle accident, you will be awarded general damages (if you make a successful claim). Those tasked with valuing this part of your claim, such as a cycle accident solicitor or another legal professional, may refer to the guideline compensation amounts for different injury types published by the Judicial College (JCG). 

Our table below looks at a few figures that could be relevant to bike accident claims. The figure in the top row shows how compensation could be awarded for multiple severe injuries plus related financial losses. In the remaining rows, we look at a few figures taken from the 17th edition of the JCG. Please note that the top row is not from the JCG. As all successful claims are different, the table is only to be used as a guide. 

InjurySeverityNotes Compensation Guideline
Multiple Very Serious Injuries and Special DamagesVery SevereClaimants could be compensated for multiple injuries and related expenses, such as their lost income and nursing care.Up to £1,000,000+
ParalysisTetraplegiaThe claimant suffers paralysis in the upper and lower body. £396,140 to £493,000
Brain DamageVery SevereNursing care is required on a full-time basis because of severe disabilities, both cognitive and physical.£344,150 to £493,000
Leg InjuriesAmputations (ii)Both legs have been amputated below the knee with the level affecting the award.£245,900 to £329,620
Leg InjuriesSevere (ii)Very serious injuries that cause permanent problems with mobility.£66,920 to £109,290
Arm InjuriesSevereThe injured person is left little better off than had their arm been amputated due to the seriousness of these injuries.£117,360 to £159,770
Injuries to the Hips and PelvisSevere (i)Extensive pelvis fractures or a hip injury that causes substantial disabilities, such as a lack of bladder and bowel control and sexual dysfunction.£95,680 to £159,770
Facial ScarringVery SevereA relatively young claimant suffers a severe psychological reaction to very disfiguring facial scars.£36,340 to £118,790
Elbow InjuriesSevereThe claimant has sustained a severe disability injury.£47,810 to £66,920
Jaw FracturesVery Serious (i)Severe pain, eating restrictions and paresthesia occur due to very serious multiple fractures.£37,210 to £55,570

You may also be awarded special damages as part of a successful cycle injury claim. Special damages are awarded to compensate for the financial losses caused by your cycling injuries. Your settlement could include compensation for:

  • Lost wages. 
  • Nursing care. 
  • Assorted medical expenses. 
  • Home help, such as with childcare. 

To help recover the maximum compensation you are entitled to, you should save proof of your costs (wage slips, receipts, invoices, bank statements). 

Talk with an advisor for more information about how reporting a cycling accident to the police may help your claim. 

What Are The Benefits Of Making A No Win No Fee Cycling Accident Claim?

If you would like to pursue a claim for cycling injury compensation, you may like to have the support of a solicitor specialising in road traffic accident claims. One of the personal injury solicitors from our panel could help you with your compensation claim. Generally, our panel offer a No Win No Fee service under a Conditional Fee Agreement (CFA)

Under a No Win No Fee agreement, your solicitor:

  • Doesn’t take an upfront payment for their services. 
  • Also won’t ask for fees as the claim is ongoing. 
  • Don’t ask you to pay for their work on your cycle accident compensation claim if it fails. 
  • Only take a small fee out of your award if your compensation claim is successful. This success fee is a percentage that is legally limited. 

If you would like to discuss how reporting a cycling accident to the police can be used as evidence, call our team. Additionally, if you would like to pursue a claim and meet the eligibility requirements, you could be connected to one of the cycling accident solicitors from our panel. 

To talk about cycling accident compensation:

  • Call 020 8050 2736
  • Fill out our claim online form to request a call back. 
  • Ask, ‘How can a No Win No Fee solicitor help me?’ in our live chat. 

A solicitor tells a claimant they can claim without reporting a cycling accident to the police.

More Resources Related To Cycling Accident Claims 

Additional guides:

External links that could be useful: 

  • Safety advice for cyclists from Think! Road Safety. 
  • Information about how to report a crime and when to call 999 from the police. 
  • Advice on road safety from the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA). 

To further discuss how reporting a cycling accident to the police may help your personal injury claim, call an advisor.